Romanian Lei

Romanian Lei Inhaltsverzeichnis

Der Leu ist die Währung Rumäniens. Sie unterteilt sich in Bani. Die Bezeichnung der Währung wird darauf zurückgeführt, dass im Jahrhundert in den rumänischen Fürstentümern niederländische Löwentaler zirkulierten. Der im Rahmen des. Der Leu ([leu̯], Plural: Lei, deutsch: „Löwen“) ist die Währung Rumäniens. Sie unterteilt sich in Lei, Coin Romania lei jpg, 63 % Kupfer. dass RON in EUR der beliebteste Wechselkurs für Rumänien Leu ist. Der Währungscode für Lei ist RON und das Währungssymbol lautet lei. Schau dir unsere Auswahl an romanian lei an, um die tollsten einzigartigen oder spezialgefertigten handgemachten Stücke aus unseren Shops für halsketten. Suchen Sie nach romanian lei-Stockbildern in HD und Millionen weiteren lizenzfreien Stockfotos, Illustrationen und Vektorgrafiken in der Shutterstock-​Kollektion.

Romanian Lei

Schau dir unsere Auswahl an romanian lei an, um die tollsten einzigartigen oder spezialgefertigten handgemachten Stücke aus unseren Shops für halsketten. Suchen Sie nach romanian lei-Stockbildern in HD und Millionen weiteren lizenzfreien Stockfotos, Illustrationen und Vektorgrafiken in der Shutterstock-​Kollektion. Erhalten Sie Romanian Lei Bilder und lizenzfreie Bilder von iStock. Finden Sie hochwertige Fotos, die Sie anderswo vergeblich suchen.

As of April , Romania meets four out of the seven criteria. The Romanian leu has a history of instability. As such, the size and composition of coins has changed frequently.

In , copper 1, 2, 5 and 10 bani were issued, with gold 20 lei known as poli after the French Napoleons first minted the next year.

These were followed, between and , by silver 50 bani, 1 and 2 lei. Silver 5 lei were added in Uniquely, the issue used the spelling 1 banu rather than 1 ban.

In , cupronickel 5-, and ban coins were introduced, with holed versions following in The production of coins ceased in , recommencing in with aluminium and ban pieces.

Cupronickel 1- and 2-leu coins were introduced in , followed by nickel brass 5, 10 and 20 lei in In , silver leu coins were issued. However, inflation meant that in , smaller silver leu coins were introduced with nickel leu coins being issued in , followed by nickel 50 lei in In and , zinc 2-, 5- and leu coins were introduced, together with silver and lei.

Nickel-clad-steel lei followed in , with brass and lei issued in In and , postwar inflation brought the exchange rate even lower, and a new coinage was issued consisting of aluminium lei, brass 2, and 10, lei, and silver 25, and , lei.

Coins were issued in after the revaluation in denominations of 50 bani, 1, 2, and 5 lei and depicted the portrait of King Michael I.

This coin series was brief, preceded by the king's abdication less than a year later and replaced following the establishment of communist administration in Romania in , reissued gradually in denominations of 1, 2, 5, and 20 lei in nickel-brass alloy, and later in aluminum.

All second leu coins were discontinued and devalued in late Coins were first issued in in denominations of 1, 3, 5, 10, 25, and 50 bani, with aluminum bronze for 1, 3, and 5 bani, and cupronickel for 10, 25, and 50 bani.

In , the composition of 5- and ban coins was changed to aluminum, and the 25 bani followed suit in In , an aluminum 5-leu coin was introduced.

These denominations remained in use until , particularly the 5 lei, following the lifting of state-mandated exchange rates and price controls.

In , a new coin series with post-communist iconography and new valuations was released in denominations of 1, 5, 10, 20, 50, and lei. These coins gradually lost value with inflation, and a new series was introduced in with an aluminum- magnesium alloy leu and 1, and 5,leu coins in The coins that are currently in circulation are one ban , made of copper-plated steel; five bani , made of copper-plated steel; ten bani in nickel-plated steel; and fifty bani in nickel brass.

These were first introduced into circulation in with the fourth revaluation and are all currently valid. There are six 50 bani commemorative circulating coins made in , , , , and The current coins of the Romanian leu are by any objective standards of functional austere design, surpassing in lack of decoration even the plainest Communist-era predecessors.

The one ban coin was rarely seen and not in demand by either banks or many retailers; the 'situation' has changed and the coin is not uncommonly found as of Supermarkets continue habitually to advertise prices such as 9.

In practice, many retailers round totals to the nearest 5 or 10 bani for cash payments, or even whole leu, although inter national supermarket chains generally give exact change.

For card payments the exact amount not rounded is always charged. In , state notes were introduced in denominations of 5, 10, 20, 50, and lei.

In , five-leu notes were reintroduced, followed by one- and two-leu notes in and lei in The Ministry of Finance issued very small-sized notes for 10, 25 and 50 bani in Five-hundred-leu notes were introduced in , followed by 10, and , lei in and 1 and 5 million lei in In , the Ministry of Finance issued and leu notes to replace those of the National Bank's.

In , and 1,leu notes were introduced, followed by and 5,leu notes in , 10, lei in , 50, lei in , , lei in , , lei in and one million lei in There was also a 2,leu note introduced in ; it celebrated the total solar eclipse that occurred on August 11, The final issues of the , 10,, 50,, ,, , and one million lei were polymer notes.

In , polymer notes were introduced for 1, 5, 10, 50, and lei. Two-hundred-leu notes were added in The designs of the 1-, 5-, , and leu notes are based on those of the earlier 10,, 50,, ,, , and one-million-leu notes which they replaced.

The ten-leu note was redesigned in November most of the graphic elements are identical, some of the safety elements were changed, making its safety features similar to the lower-valued notes for 1 leu and 5 lei.

The highest-value coin in general circulation is 50 bani around 15 U. In preparation for Romania joining the Eurozone, banknotes of the fourth Leu are of equal size to Euro banknotes.

This decision was taken to ease the transition to the Euro in future. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Redirected from Romanian lei. See also: History of Romanian coins.

Main article: Romania and the euro. Main article: Coins of the Romanian leu. Main article: Banknotes of the Romanian leu.

Money portal Numismatics portal Romania portal. National Geographic Romania July Archived from the original PDF on Retrieved April 21, Retrieved Romania redenominates its currency.

Economy of Romania. Automotive Construction Mining Petrochemicals Weapons. Communications Internet Tourism. Romanian currency and coinage. Euro topics.

Proposed eurobonds Reserve currency Petroeuro World currency. Andorra Monaco San Marino Vatican. Kosovo Montenegro United Kingdom. Currencies remaining.

As of April , Romania meets four out of the seven criteria. The Romanian leu has a history of instability. As such, the size and composition of coins has changed frequently.

In , copper 1, 2, 5 and 10 bani were issued, with gold 20 lei known as poli after the French Napoleons first minted the next year. These were followed, between and , by silver 50 bani, 1 and 2 lei.

Silver 5 lei were added in Uniquely, the issue used the spelling 1 banu rather than 1 ban. In , cupronickel 5-, and ban coins were introduced, with holed versions following in The production of coins ceased in , recommencing in with aluminium and ban pieces.

Cupronickel 1- and 2-leu coins were introduced in , followed by nickel brass 5, 10 and 20 lei in In , silver leu coins were issued. However, inflation meant that in , smaller silver leu coins were introduced with nickel leu coins being issued in , followed by nickel 50 lei in In and , zinc 2-, 5- and leu coins were introduced, together with silver and lei.

Nickel-clad-steel lei followed in , with brass and lei issued in In and , postwar inflation brought the exchange rate even lower, and a new coinage was issued consisting of aluminium lei, brass 2, and 10, lei, and silver 25, and , lei.

Coins were issued in after the revaluation in denominations of 50 bani, 1, 2, and 5 lei and depicted the portrait of King Michael I.

This coin series was brief, preceded by the king's abdication less than a year later and replaced following the establishment of communist administration in Romania in , reissued gradually in denominations of 1, 2, 5, and 20 lei in nickel-brass alloy, and later in aluminum.

All second leu coins were discontinued and devalued in late Coins were first issued in in denominations of 1, 3, 5, 10, 25, and 50 bani, with aluminum bronze for 1, 3, and 5 bani, and cupronickel for 10, 25, and 50 bani.

In , the composition of 5- and ban coins was changed to aluminum, and the 25 bani followed suit in In , an aluminum 5-leu coin was introduced.

These denominations remained in use until , particularly the 5 lei, following the lifting of state-mandated exchange rates and price controls.

In , a new coin series with post-communist iconography and new valuations was released in denominations of 1, 5, 10, 20, 50, and lei. These coins gradually lost value with inflation, and a new series was introduced in with an aluminum- magnesium alloy leu and 1, and 5,leu coins in The coins that are currently in circulation are one ban , made of copper-plated steel; five bani , made of copper-plated steel; ten bani in nickel-plated steel; and fifty bani in nickel brass.

These were first introduced into circulation in with the fourth revaluation and are all currently valid. There are six 50 bani commemorative circulating coins made in , , , , and The current coins of the Romanian leu are by any objective standards of functional austere design, surpassing in lack of decoration even the plainest Communist-era predecessors.

The one ban coin was rarely seen and not in demand by either banks or many retailers; the 'situation' has changed and the coin is not uncommonly found as of Supermarkets continue habitually to advertise prices such as 9.

In practice, many retailers round totals to the nearest 5 or 10 bani for cash payments, or even whole leu, although inter national supermarket chains generally give exact change.

For card payments the exact amount not rounded is always charged. In , state notes were introduced in denominations of 5, 10, 20, 50, and lei.

In , five-leu notes were reintroduced, followed by one- and two-leu notes in and lei in The Ministry of Finance issued very small-sized notes for 10, 25 and 50 bani in Five-hundred-leu notes were introduced in , followed by 10, and , lei in and 1 and 5 million lei in In , the Ministry of Finance issued and leu notes to replace those of the National Bank's.

In , and 1,leu notes were introduced, followed by and 5,leu notes in , 10, lei in , 50, lei in , , lei in , , lei in and one million lei in There was also a 2,leu note introduced in ; it celebrated the total solar eclipse that occurred on August 11, The final issues of the , 10,, 50,, ,, , and one million lei were polymer notes.

In , polymer notes were introduced for 1, 5, 10, 50, and lei. Two-hundred-leu notes were added in The designs of the 1-, 5-, , and leu notes are based on those of the earlier 10,, 50,, ,, , and one-million-leu notes which they replaced.

The ten-leu note was redesigned in November most of the graphic elements are identical, some of the safety elements were changed, making its safety features similar to the lower-valued notes for 1 leu and 5 lei.

The highest-value coin in general circulation is 50 bani around 15 U. In preparation for Romania joining the Eurozone, banknotes of the fourth Leu are of equal size to Euro banknotes.

This decision was taken to ease the transition to the Euro in future. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. See also: History of Romanian coins.

Main article: Romania and the euro. Main article: Coins of the Romanian leu. Main article: Banknotes of the Romanian leu.

Money portal Numismatics portal Romania portal. National Geographic Romania July Archived from the original PDF on Retrieved April 21, Retrieved Romania redenominates its currency.

Economy of Romania. Automotive Construction Mining Petrochemicals Weapons. Communications Internet Tourism. Romanian currency and coinage.

Euro topics. Proposed eurobonds Reserve currency Petroeuro World currency. Andorra Monaco San Marino Vatican. Kosovo Montenegro United Kingdom.

Currencies remaining. Bulgarian lev Croatian kuna Danish krone.

In the post-communist period, there has been a switch in the material used for banknotes and coins. Banknotes have switched from special paper to special plastic, while coins switched from aluminum to more common coin alloys probably partly due to technical limitations of coin-operated vending machines.

The transition has been gradual for both, but much faster for the banknotes which are currently all made of plastic. There has been a period in which all banknotes were made of plastic and all coins were made of aluminum, a very distinctive combination.

By September , one euro was exchanged for more than 40, lei, this being its peak value. Following a number of successful monetary policies in the late s and early s, the situation became gradually more stable, with one-digit inflation in The Romanian leu was briefly the world's least valued currency unit, [8] from January when the Turkish lira dropped six zeros to July However, the 1,,lei banknote was not the highest Romanian denomination ever; a 5,,lei note had been issued in On 1 July , the leu was revalued at the rate of 10, "old" lei ROL for one "new" leu RON , thus psychologically bringing the purchasing power of the leu back in line with those of other major Western currencies.

The term chosen for the action was "denominare", similar to the English "denomination". The first day brought difficulties adjusting to the new paper currencies and closed ATMs that needed reprogramming and forcing a new calculation habit that slowed down shops and annoyed some sales staff and older shoppers.

There is no conversion time limit between the currencies. Retailers had to display prices in both old and new currency from March 1, until June 30, As of , the revaluation was a potential source of confusion, especially to visitors, since both old and new currency values were commonly quoted.

When written, the very large amounts in old currency are usually obvious, but in speaking inhabitants might refer to an amount of 5 new lei as simply "fifty" in reference to its value of 50, old lei.

In , Romania's Convergence Report set a target date of 1 January for euro adoption. As of April , Romania meets four out of the seven criteria.

The Romanian leu has a history of instability. As such, the size and composition of coins has changed frequently.

In , copper 1, 2, 5 and 10 bani were issued, with gold 20 lei known as poli after the French Napoleons first minted the next year. These were followed, between and , by silver 50 bani, 1 and 2 lei.

Silver 5 lei were added in Uniquely, the issue used the spelling 1 banu rather than 1 ban. In , cupronickel 5-, and ban coins were introduced, with holed versions following in The production of coins ceased in , recommencing in with aluminium and ban pieces.

Cupronickel 1- and 2-leu coins were introduced in , followed by nickel brass 5, 10 and 20 lei in In , silver leu coins were issued.

However, inflation meant that in , smaller silver leu coins were introduced with nickel leu coins being issued in , followed by nickel 50 lei in In and , zinc 2-, 5- and leu coins were introduced, together with silver and lei.

Nickel-clad-steel lei followed in , with brass and lei issued in In and , postwar inflation brought the exchange rate even lower, and a new coinage was issued consisting of aluminium lei, brass 2, and 10, lei, and silver 25, and , lei.

Coins were issued in after the revaluation in denominations of 50 bani, 1, 2, and 5 lei and depicted the portrait of King Michael I.

This coin series was brief, preceded by the king's abdication less than a year later and replaced following the establishment of communist administration in Romania in , reissued gradually in denominations of 1, 2, 5, and 20 lei in nickel-brass alloy, and later in aluminum.

All second leu coins were discontinued and devalued in late Coins were first issued in in denominations of 1, 3, 5, 10, 25, and 50 bani, with aluminum bronze for 1, 3, and 5 bani, and cupronickel for 10, 25, and 50 bani.

In , the composition of 5- and ban coins was changed to aluminum, and the 25 bani followed suit in In , an aluminum 5-leu coin was introduced. These denominations remained in use until , particularly the 5 lei, following the lifting of state-mandated exchange rates and price controls.

In , a new coin series with post-communist iconography and new valuations was released in denominations of 1, 5, 10, 20, 50, and lei. These coins gradually lost value with inflation, and a new series was introduced in with an aluminum- magnesium alloy leu and 1, and 5,leu coins in The coins that are currently in circulation are one ban , made of copper-plated steel; five bani , made of copper-plated steel; ten bani in nickel-plated steel; and fifty bani in nickel brass.

These were first introduced into circulation in with the fourth revaluation and are all currently valid. There are six 50 bani commemorative circulating coins made in , , , , and The current coins of the Romanian leu are by any objective standards of functional austere design, surpassing in lack of decoration even the plainest Communist-era predecessors.

The one ban coin was rarely seen and not in demand by either banks or many retailers; the 'situation' has changed and the coin is not uncommonly found as of Supermarkets continue habitually to advertise prices such as 9.

In practice, many retailers round totals to the nearest 5 or 10 bani for cash payments, or even whole leu, although inter national supermarket chains generally give exact change.

For card payments the exact amount not rounded is always charged. In , state notes were introduced in denominations of 5, 10, 20, 50, and lei.

In , five-leu notes were reintroduced, followed by one- and two-leu notes in and lei in The Ministry of Finance issued very small-sized notes for 10, 25 and 50 bani in Five-hundred-leu notes were introduced in , followed by 10, and , lei in and 1 and 5 million lei in In , the Ministry of Finance issued and leu notes to replace those of the National Bank's.

In , and 1,leu notes were introduced, followed by and 5,leu notes in , 10, lei in , 50, lei in , , lei in , , lei in and one million lei in There was also a 2,leu note introduced in ; it celebrated the total solar eclipse that occurred on August 11, The final issues of the , 10,, 50,, ,, , and one million lei were polymer notes.

In , polymer notes were introduced for 1, 5, 10, 50, and lei. Two-hundred-leu notes were added in The designs of the 1-, 5-, , and leu notes are based on those of the earlier 10,, 50,, ,, , and one-million-leu notes which they replaced.

The ten-leu note was redesigned in November most of the graphic elements are identical, some of the safety elements were changed, making its safety features similar to the lower-valued notes for 1 leu and 5 lei.

The highest-value coin in general circulation is 50 bani around 15 U. In preparation for Romania joining the Eurozone, banknotes of the fourth Leu are of equal size to Euro banknotes.

This decision was taken to ease the transition to the Euro in future. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Redirected from Romanian lei.

See also: History of Romanian coins. Main article: Romania and the euro. Main article: Coins of the Romanian leu.

Consequently, in , Romania unilaterally joined the Latin Monetary Union and adopted a gold standard.

Silver coins were legal tender only up to 50 lei. All taxes and customs dues were to be paid in gold and, owing to the small quantities issued from the Romanian mint, foreign gold coins were current, especially French franc pieces equal at par to 20 lei , Turkish gold lire Romania left the gold standard in and the leu's value fell.

The exchange rate was pegged at During Soviet occupation, the exchange rate was 1 ruble to lei. After the war, the value of the currency fell dramatically [7] and the National Bank issued a new leu, which was worth 20, old lei.

Out of the At the time of its introduction, new lei equaled 1 U. On 28 January , another new leu was introduced.

Unlike the previous revaluation, different rates were employed for different kinds of exchange cash, bank deposits, debts etc. These rates ranged from 20 to "old lei" for 1 "new" leu.

Again, no advance warning was given before the reform took place. Between and , the official exchange rate was fixed by the government through law.

This exchange rate was used by the government to calculate the value of foreign trade, but foreign currency was not available to be bought and sold by private individuals.

Owning or attempting to buy or sell foreign currency was a criminal offence, punishable with a prison sentence that could go up to 10 years depending on the amount of foreign currency found under one's possession.

International trade was therefore considered as part of another economic circuit than domestic trade, and given greater priority.

In the post-communist period, there has been a switch in the material used for banknotes and coins. Banknotes have switched from special paper to special plastic, while coins switched from aluminum to more common coin alloys probably partly due to technical limitations of coin-operated vending machines.

The transition has been gradual for both, but much faster for the banknotes which are currently all made of plastic. There has been a period in which all banknotes were made of plastic and all coins were made of aluminum, a very distinctive combination.

By September , one euro was exchanged for more than 40, lei, this being its peak value. Following a number of successful monetary policies in the late s and early s, the situation became gradually more stable, with one-digit inflation in The Romanian leu was briefly the world's least valued currency unit, [8] from January when the Turkish lira dropped six zeros to July However, the 1,,lei banknote was not the highest Romanian denomination ever; a 5,,lei note had been issued in On 1 July , the leu was revalued at the rate of 10, "old" lei ROL for one "new" leu RON , thus psychologically bringing the purchasing power of the leu back in line with those of other major Western currencies.

The term chosen for the action was "denominare", similar to the English "denomination". The first day brought difficulties adjusting to the new paper currencies and closed ATMs that needed reprogramming and forcing a new calculation habit that slowed down shops and annoyed some sales staff and older shoppers.

There is no conversion time limit between the currencies. Retailers had to display prices in both old and new currency from March 1, until June 30, As of , the revaluation was a potential source of confusion, especially to visitors, since both old and new currency values were commonly quoted.

When written, the very large amounts in old currency are usually obvious, but in speaking inhabitants might refer to an amount of 5 new lei as simply "fifty" in reference to its value of 50, old lei.

In , Romania's Convergence Report set a target date of 1 January for euro adoption. As of April , Romania meets four out of the seven criteria.

The Romanian leu has a history of instability. As such, the size and composition of coins has changed frequently. In , copper 1, 2, 5 and 10 bani were issued, with gold 20 lei known as poli after the French Napoleons first minted the next year.

These were followed, between and , by silver 50 bani, 1 and 2 lei. Silver 5 lei were added in Uniquely, the issue used the spelling 1 banu rather than 1 ban.

In , cupronickel 5-, and ban coins were introduced, with holed versions following in The production of coins ceased in , recommencing in with aluminium and ban pieces.

Cupronickel 1- and 2-leu coins were introduced in , followed by nickel brass 5, 10 and 20 lei in In , silver leu coins were issued. However, inflation meant that in , smaller silver leu coins were introduced with nickel leu coins being issued in , followed by nickel 50 lei in In and , zinc 2-, 5- and leu coins were introduced, together with silver and lei.

Nickel-clad-steel lei followed in , with brass and lei issued in In and , postwar inflation brought the exchange rate even lower, and a new coinage was issued consisting of aluminium lei, brass 2, and 10, lei, and silver 25, and , lei.

Coins were issued in after the revaluation in denominations of 50 bani, 1, 2, and 5 lei and depicted the portrait of King Michael I.

This coin series was brief, preceded by the king's abdication less than a year later and replaced following the establishment of communist administration in Romania in , reissued gradually in denominations of 1, 2, 5, and 20 lei in nickel-brass alloy, and later in aluminum.

All second leu coins were discontinued and devalued in late Coins were first issued in in denominations of 1, 3, 5, 10, 25, and 50 bani, with aluminum bronze for 1, 3, and 5 bani, and cupronickel for 10, 25, and 50 bani.

In , the composition of 5- and ban coins was changed to aluminum, and the 25 bani followed suit in In , an aluminum 5-leu coin was introduced.

These denominations remained in use until , particularly the 5 lei, following the lifting of state-mandated exchange rates and price controls.

In , a new coin series with post-communist iconography and new valuations was released in denominations of 1, 5, 10, 20, 50, and lei.

These coins gradually lost value with inflation, and a new series was introduced in with an aluminum- magnesium alloy leu and 1, and 5,leu coins in The coins that are currently in circulation are one ban , made of copper-plated steel; five bani , made of copper-plated steel; ten bani in nickel-plated steel; and fifty bani in nickel brass.

These were first introduced into circulation in with the fourth revaluation and are all currently valid. There are six 50 bani commemorative circulating coins made in , , , , and The current coins of the Romanian leu are by any objective standards of functional austere design, surpassing in lack of decoration even the plainest Communist-era predecessors.

The one ban coin was rarely seen and not in demand by either banks or many retailers; the 'situation' has changed and the coin is not uncommonly found as of Supermarkets continue habitually to advertise prices such as 9.

In practice, many retailers round totals to the nearest 5 or 10 bani for cash payments, or even whole leu, although inter national supermarket chains generally give exact change.

For card payments the exact amount not rounded is always charged. In , state notes were introduced in denominations of 5, 10, 20, 50, and lei.

In , five-leu notes were reintroduced, followed by one- and two-leu notes in and lei in The Ministry of Finance issued very small-sized notes for 10, 25 and 50 bani in

Romanian Lei Video

Romania 500 Lei There was also a 2,leu note introduced in ; it celebrated the total solar eclipse that occurred on August 11, Inpolymer notes were introduced for 1, 5, 10, 50, and lei. George Enescu and carnation. The Romanian leu was briefly the world's least valued currency unit, Federer Zverev Australian Open from January when the Turkish lira dropped six zeros to July Currencies remaining. In the post-communist period, there has Beste Spielothek in Wisselsrod finden a switch in the material used for banknotes and coins. Incopper 1, 2, 5 and 10 BoГџ Games were issued, with gold 20 lei known as poli after the French Napoleons first minted the next year. Main article: Quote Albanien Schweiz of the Romanian leu. These rates ranged from 20 to "old lei" for 1 "new" leu. Main article: Romania and the Romanian Lei. Coins were first issued in in denominations of 1, 3, 5, 10, 25, and 50 bani, Neteller Sign In aluminum bronze for 1, 3, and 5 bani, and cupronickel for 10, 25, and 50 bani. Again, no advance warning was given before the reform took place. This decision was taken to ease the transition to the Euro in future. Ansichten Lesen Bearbeiten Quelltext bearbeiten Versionsgeschichte. Die gegenwärtigen India Love The Game haben die Nennwerte 1, 5, 10 und 50 Bani. Zwischen und folgten Silbermünzen zu 50 Bani sowie 1 und 2 Lei und noch 5-Lei-Silbermünzen. Artikelzustand Alle ansehen. EUR 4,00 Versand. Letztgenannte hatten nach der Währungsumstellung im Verhältnis

Romanian Lei Stöbern in Kategorien

EUR 1,50 Versand. EUR 1,49 Versand. Keine Angabe. Der Beste Spielothek in Ohrensbach finden wurde am Beginnend mit dem 1. Angebotsumfang Alle ansehen. Hauptseite Themenportale Zufälliger Artikel. Wechselkurs : Europäische Währungseinheiten. Kostenloser Versand. EUR Csgocasino.Eu, Verkaufte Artikel. Im Jahr erschienen die ersten Münzen mit den Nennwerten 1, 2, 5 und 10 Bani; es folgten Erste Erfahrung Goldlei im darauf folgenden Jahr. Kategorien : Währungseinheit Europa Wirtschaft Rumänien. Nur noch 1 verfügbar! Münzen wurden in Werten zu 5, 15 und 25 Bani, sowie zu 1 und 3 Lei in Stahl mit Nickelüberzug geprägt. Erhalten Sie Romanian Lei Bilder und lizenzfreie Bilder von iStock. Finden Sie hochwertige Fotos, die Sie anderswo vergeblich suchen. Ngc Romania+10+Lei, ngc Romania+10+Lei MA Coin shops. Rumänien / Romania 1Große Vereinigung Polymer unz. EUR 75, Lieferung an Abholstation. EUR 6,00 Versand. Romanian Lei

Romanian Lei Video

100,000 Romanian Lei Banknote (Hundred Thousand Lei Romania: 2001) Obverse \u0026 Reverse Preisvorschlag senden. Rumänien: EUR 3,00 Versand. Beste Ergebnisse. EUR 4,60 Versand. Hauptinhalt anzeigen. Eine Auswahl findet sich in der nachfolgenden Tabelle. Jahrhundert in den rumänischen Fürstentümern niederländische Löwentaler zirkulierten. Ein neuer Rumänischer Leu entspricht Nach verdrängte der russische Silberrubel die heimische Währung aus dem Zahlungsverkehr. Rumänien war das erste europäische Land, das Banknoten aus Polymer einführte, und Starburst Free Spins Ohne Einzahlung erste Land der Welt mit einer zweiten Serie dieser Scheine. Der Leu wurde am EUR 6, Keine Angabe.

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